M S I ENVIRONMENTAL          COMMITTED TO SAFE AND RESPONSIBLE ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Mike's Sanitation, Inc.

8810 Brockman Rd.

New Bremen, OH  45869

800-786-3691

419-629-3695

 

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SEPTIC TANKS

The septic tank is basically an on-site sewage treatment and disposal system buried in the ground. The septic system consists of the septic tank and a soil absorption area.

The main types of septic systems found in our service area include:

Subsurface Sand Filter:  As the water flows out of the septic tank, it enters a distribution box, out of which several tiles are placed. The water flows equally to these four tiles, which are perforated. The water then flows through the holes in the tile into a layer of approximately 2 feet of filter sand. Gradually, beneficial micro-organisms help break down the wastewater further. The sand also acts as a clarifier of the water. By the time the water filters down to the collection tile at the bottom of the filter, the bacteria and suspended solids have been greatly reduced.

 

Leaching Tile Fields:  These tile fields are used to disperse the liquid portion of household sewage into the soils surrounding the home. Typically, 8-12 lines or “fingers” are trenched into the soil near the house. These lines may be over 100 feet long and they contain perforated plastic tile that is surrounded by 12 inches or more of gravel. Under ideal conditions the water fills the gravel trench and is absorbed by the surrounding soils. When functioning correctly, these systems do not discharge any water into the surrounding streams, tiles or ditches. Leach lines can often be located by identifying heavy, green growth of lawn grass in the yard.

 

Aerator:  Home aeration systems are basically large city treatment plants that have been “miniaturized” to treat individual household sewage flows. These units use an electric motor to blow or stir air into a sewage filled holding tank. Highly efficient aerobic bacteria then consume the human waste and reduce organic material and disease causing bacteria. A specially designed filter then removes any remaining solids before the treated water is discharged into a tile, stream or drainage ditch. While somewhat expensive to operate and maintain, these systems do a good job treating the sewage waste.

 

Mound Systems:  After leaving the septic tank, the effluent is pumped from a dosing chamber to the mound. The mound, as the name implies, consists of a certain type and size of sand mounded on top of the natural soil. This helps treat and dispose of the septic tank effluent. A layer of gravel is placed on top of the sand. Next, the gravel is covered with construction fabric followed by a layer of soil placed over the entire mound. The soil layer is to protect the mound from freezing. Planting grass on top of the mound is necessary to control erosion. However, trees or any woody plants should not be grown on the mound to avoid root damage to the pipes in these distribution systems. These systems typically cost about twice as much as the systems discussed above, but in areas with inadequate soil depth or other limiting factors for conventional systems, the mound system can be a good and sometimes the only alternative.